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4th ASEF Young Leaders Summit

Asia-Europe Foundation Young Leaders Summit

Opportunity for Youth – 4th ASEF Young Leaders Summit: Open Call

4th ASEF Young Leaders Summit

Sustainable Development Post Covid-19

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4th ASEF Young Leaders Summit
The 4th ASEF Young Leaders Summit (ASEFYLS4) is your opportunity to…
Receive a certified course on the Sustainable Development Goals and Leadership, by world-leading Higher Education and training institutions, the College of Europe in Natolin, and the Center for Creative Leadership
Engage with ASEM Leaders and even moderate Youth Dialogues with ASEM Heads of States and Governments
Be featured and bring the youth voice into an ASEM-wide Youth Leadership Report, as well as the ASEM Youth Declaration, presented at the Opening Ceremony of the 13th ASEM Summit 
Leave a positive mark in local communities across Asia and Europe through ASEFYLS4 Leadership in Action projects
Be part of our ASEM & ASEF youth community

Volunteer for the annual Goulburn Show NSW 2021

Code: AU-IVP 12.1

Title: Goulburn Show

Dates: Sat 27th February – Thurs 11th March 2021

Where: Goulburn, NSW

Number of vols: 5

Participation Fee: $150 (AUD) (covers food, accommodation, insurance, camp leader, day trip to Canberra, sightseeing in Goulburn).

Host: Goulburn Agricultural, Pastoral and Horticultural Society began in 1880. They organise the Goulburn Show each year, showcasing the very best of agricultural produce, local creative talents, school artwork and related activities. Goulburn Show is one of the largest community events in the region. www.goulburnshow.com.au

Volunteer work: For the volunteers it will be fun and rewarding to work with local community-minded people. The Show will take place on 6th and 7th March 2021 . You will work behind the scenes and help put the Goulburn Show together, set up infrastructure for the show and pack away afterwards. The work will be approximately 6-7 hours per day with tasks as required, mostly physical with some moderate lifting. You will be working alongside local volunteers; helping erect tables, setting up displays, fencing, laying carpets, general office duties and even chasing a forklift! Cleaning up after the show may include mucking up straw. During the show you will help for a few hours, on a rotating roster, to run an information stall about international volunteering and sustainability. Your ideas are welcome for this.

Cultural activities: You will have free tickets to the Show. You will learn about agricultural issues, in particular wool growing which has an important place in the history of Australia and Goulburn. There will be a whole day sightseeing trip, possibly to Canberra, and time after work for local sightseeing / shopping.

Accommodation: The team will live together in a small building at the showground. Stretchers, mattresses, sheets, pillows and blankets will be supplied. There will be a roster for shopping, cooking and cleaning. Toilets, showers and a washing machine are in the building. The town centre is a 20 minute walk away and there you can find supermarkets, post office, cinema, nature walks and a swimming pool.

Arrival and departure: Nearest international airports are Sydney and Canberra, from there it would be train or bus to and from Goulburn Railway Station, which is conveniently located in the centre of town. Detailed information about train times will be given closer to the start of the workcamp (in case of change of timetable). Please aim to arrive in the afternoon of 27th February 2021. On arrival there will be a group welcome and orientation to get to know Goulburn, the project and your hosts. There will be a walk around the grounds to familiarise you with the surroundings. Activities will start from Monday 1st March, until Tuesday 9th March. The next day Wednesday 10th March there will be an evaluation, excursion and farewell barbeque with the local volunteers. Thursday 11th March is the final day, time to wind down, pack up, you can plan to leave any time on this day that suits you.

What to bring: Wide brimmed sun hat, closed work shoes/boots and appropriate work clothes. The weather can be very changeable, one moment very and the next, a cold snap, so bring clothes for all climates, including possible rain.

Requirement: You will be working with children during the camp, therefore the Australian authorities require you to have a Working With Children Check. Please, apply for that online here , prior to arriving in Goulburn. Keep your application number, because you will have to report that on arrival.

Contact IVP: placements@ivp.org.au

Project Coordinator: David Hessey – dogbolterdave@gmail.com

Mile High in Mongolia: a workcamp story

by Monica Kampfer

Attending a work camp near Ulaanbaatar gave Monica Kampfer a chance to help Mongolia’s orphans and experience the nomadic lifestyle.

After spending a day sightseeing in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia’s polluted and overcrowded capital, it was a relief to arrive at the camp. The campsite at Buhug was in a very remote and beautiful location, surrounded by green hills and blue sky.

The children gave us a warm welcome and the more outgoing ones wanted to talk to us straight away. They were from the government-run orphanage. During the summer the orphans stay in two summer camps. This one is a vegetable farm and houses 150 children aged from eight to 18. It grows food for the kids to eat in the winter.

Getting to know the sea turtle: a workcamp story from Mexico

By Jade Herriman

“For the animal shall not be measured by man. In a world older and more complete than ours, they move finished and complete, gifted with extensions of the senses we have lost or never attained, living by voices we shall never hear. They are not brethren, they are not underlings, they are other nations caught with ourselves in the net of life and time, fellow prisoners of the splendour and travail of the earth” – Henry Beston

Becoming deeply involved with SCI

A Long-term Volunteer Story By Morgana Jolin-Thomas

Becoming so deeply involved with SCI wasn’t what I planned. I had just spent four years at university studying Economics, specialising in international economic relations so my brain was full, to the point of exploding, with the hard realities of global politics and power. I had begun my studies full of enthusiasm; I had this huge feeling inside me that with just a little bit of effort, I could solve the world’s problems. I soon became immersed in a world of economic theory, profit motives, multinational corporations and conflicts over resources. Hundreds of years of history put the state of the modern world into context. I came to realise that I wasn’t the first person to have the bright idea to try and sort out this mess.