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UKRAINEL: Start negotiating. Stop the War.

 Media Release
                     FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  25th February, 2022

UKRAINE: Start negotiating. Stop the War.

IPAN joins Nuclearban.USin calling for an immediate ceasefire in Ukraine and for negotiations leading to a peaceful solution to the present crisis, taking into consideration the wider security needs of all the parties involved, including Russia.

IPAN Spokesperson Mr. Stephen Darley states “the question needs to be asked is this a proxy war between two competing powers Russia and the USA?

Further he states “The illegal attacks on Ukrainian military installations by Russia closely follows the pattern of recent illegal and disastrous invasions of other countries by the United States.”
“The US and allied invasion and occupation of Iraq, for instance, was in direct violation of UN resolutions and of international law. The NATO bombing of Serbia four years earlier was similarly in direct violation of UN resolutions and of international law.”

IPAN calls on the Australian Government to support a peaceful and just resolution in Ukraine by:Calling for an immediate de-escalation of the current crisis. A diplomatic path forward is still possible such as military disengagement and a negotiated solution. Such a response could be based on the 2015 Minsk agreement, that takes into account the legitimate security interests of Russia and Ukraine including the 4 million people of the Donbass region.
Calling for a United Nations Peacekeeping force to be formed to supervise a ceasefire.
Calling on all relevant parties to cease military operations in Ukraine and support a ceasefire, including a cessation of hostilities between the government of Ukraine and the people of Donbass.
Supporting the retention of Russian troops in the Donbass region to protect the people of Donbass until they can determine their own future.
Signing the Treaty to Prohibit Nuclear Weapons (TPNW) as this current crisis highlights the danger of an escalation to a nuclear conflict.
Mr Darley urges this course of action on the Australian government saying: “These actions are urgent and necessary to forestall the potential for an escalating war which could involve the U.S. and NATO military against the Russian military causing widespread destruction and suffering together with the danger of nuclear weapons being used.”
IPAN therefore also calls on the Australian GovernmentTo desist in the application of sanctions against the Russian Government which impact on Russian people
To cease military or intelligence support for the Ukrainian government and
To promote these peace proposals by urging the UK and US governments with whom it has close relationships, to support them also.
We express our solidarity with the people of Ukraine and Russia in their demands for peace.

SCI Statement against war in Ukraine

24 February 2022

No war in Ukraine! No war anywhere!

We, the undersigned Service Civil International (SCI) organisations, strongly condemn the full-scale military invasion of Ukraine by Russia. We express our solidarity with the people of Ukraine. In particular, we express our solidarity with and support for peace movements and peace activists in Ukraine, Russia and internationally, as they resist the war. 

We are concerned that this invasion leads to a huge number of victims and deaths, injuries and severe emotional distress among civilians and military in the countries concerned. It can cause significant deterioration of infrastructure and the ecosystem, an economic crisis and mass displacement of people.

We call upon the Russian decision makers to immediately stop the violence and withdraw their troops from Ukraine and bordering territories. We call upon the international community and all parties involved to engage in substantial and sincere diplomatic negotiations in accordance with international agreements and place the humanitarian needs of civilians first. We call upon the countries of the European Union to welcome people fleeing the conflict in Ukraine and guarantee international protection.

A war undermines efforts at global cooperation. It leads to an increase in military spending, while resources are much needed to address pressing global issues, such as the climate crisis and the COVID-19 pandemic. Given the technologies available for warfare today, among them huge arsenals of nuclear weapons, de-escalation is the only way forward.

We call upon people within our network and all over the world to stand up against the war in Ukraine. We ask you to join or organise demonstrations for a diplomatic resolution and against a further military escalation of the conflict. Call for an immediate ceasefire as well as a peaceful and diplomatic resolution of the conflict on social media and with decision-makers in your countries.

Peace is a choice that all parties in the conflict must commit to now! Diplomacy is the only real method for conflict resolution! No to war in Ukraine!

Service Civil International is an international peace organisation active since 1920. We are dedicated to promoting a culture of peace by organising international voluntary projects for people of all ages and backgrounds. The organisation consists of 40 branches and more than 90 partner organisations. We oppose all forms of armed conflict and militarization. Since its beginnings, SCI has developed peaceful dialogue between people of all nations, with the vision of a world without armed conflict, hostility and with positive peace. For many years, we have been supporting peace and reconciliation efforts in Ukraine and Russia.

Branches and partners that support this statement:

  1. SCI Hellas
  2. SCI Austria
  3. Stowarzyszenie Jeden Świat – SCI Poland
  4. ÚTILAPU Hungary
  5. Volonterski centar Vojvodine
  6. SCI IVS USA
  7. SCI Catalunya
  8. Mati Canada (not SCI)
  9. SCI Germany
  10. SCI Italy
  11. GAIA SCI Kosovo
  12. IVP Australia

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