MEMBERS AREA

The Big School Walk Outs organised by School Strike for Climate Action

Dozens of my classmates and I have been striking from school to demand our politicians treat climate change for what it is – a crisis – and put an urgent end to terrible fossil fuel projects like Adani’s coal mine.

We’ve been striking a day a week throughout November. Now we’re inviting all of you – your kids, your friends, parents and anyone who cares about our future to join us at a BIG SCHOOL WALK OUT near you this Thursday and Friday.

Castlemaine school strikers Milou, 14 (left), Harriet, 14 (centre) and Nimowei, 14 (right).

Kids have organised school walkouts across the country – in every capital city, including Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane and Perth, and across regional Australia, from Townsville and the Whitsundays, to Lismore, Albury-Wodonga, Cygnet and more!
We have been overwhelmed by the support from people across Australia and overseas, flooded with media interest and had our hearts warmed to see how many people support us.

Now we need to take that support and channel it where it matters most – our politicians. We need to call them out for failing to protect us from climate change, and demand they stop dirty fossil fuel projects like Adani’s coal mine.

Find a big school walk out near you and join kids striking for urgent climate action.

At the walk outs, kids will speak about why they’re striking, we’ll play music and we’ll write letters to our leaders to demand they act now to #StopAdani and urgently stop more damage to our precious climate.

With just a decade left to avoid the worst impacts of climate change, we are fighting for our futures. We may be too young to vote but we can still make our voices count. We are in a climate crisis yet our politicians prefer to side with rich mining companies like Adani than do what it takes to ensure a decent future for kids everywhere.

Us kids didn’t create this problem but we’re going to do whatever it takes to help fix it – and our politicians should too. We’re striking to show them how serious this has become.

The Big School Walk Outs are independent events organised by School Strike for Climate Action. Join us at your nearest walk out this Thursday and Friday.
See you soon!

Harriet

Harriet, School Strike for Climate Action

International Day of Peace

http://www.un.org/en/events/peaceday/

Each year the International Day of Peace is observed around the world on 21 September. The General Assembly has declared this as a day devoted to strengthening the ideals of peace, both within and among all nations and peoples.

The United Nations Member States adopted the 17 Sustainable Development Goals in 2015 because they understood that it would not be possible to build a peaceful world if steps were not taken to achieve economic and social development for all people everywhere, and ensure that their rights were protected.  The Sustainable Goals cover a broad range of issues, including poverty, hunger, health, education, climate change, gender equality, water, sanitation, energy, environment and social justice.

SDG 16

Sustainable Development Goal 16 “Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions” calls for promoting peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, providing access to justice for all and building effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels.

A peaceful society is one where there is justice and equality for everyone. Peace will enable a sustainable environment to take shape and a sustainable environment will help promote peace.

 

2018 Theme: “The Right to Peace – The Universal Declaration of Human Rights at 70”

The theme celebrates the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 as a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations.

The Universal Declaration – the most translated document in the world, available in more than 500 languages – is as relevant today as it was on the day that it was adopted.

“It is time all nations and all people live up to the words of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which recognizes the inherent dignity and equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human race. This year marks the 70th anniversary of that landmark document.” — Secretary-General António Guterres

The Universal Declaration states in Article 3. “Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of person.” These elements build the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world.

Yet, the Universal Declaration does not include a separate article on “Right to Peace”. This is why we ask you this year:

What does “The Right to Peace” mean to you? Share your ideas with us through #peaceday and #standup4humanright.

In the lead up to the International Day of Peace on 21 September, we call upon all to take action.

You can support SDG 16 Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions by seeking  peaceful resolution of conflict when disagreements arise around you.  You can be part of the solution by taking small steps. You can prevent an injustice at school or in your community by adopting a non-violent approach to problem solving and reporting potential crimes, including online bullying.

You can promote human rights by collecting and promoting videos of as many articles as possible in as many languages as possible. Record yourself reading one of the 30 articles of the Declaration in any of the 135 languages currently available and share your video with your friends.

You can engage by speaking up when others are at risk and stand with others’ human rights at work, in school and around the dinner table.

You can reflect how each of us can stand up for rights, every day.

Human rights are everyone’s rights.

MEMBERS BLOGS

Becoming deeply involved with SCI

A Long-term Volunteer Story By Morgana Jolin-Thomas

Becoming so deeply involved with SCI wasn’t what I planned. I had just spent four years at university studying Economics, specialising in international economic relations so my brain was full, to the point of exploding, with the hard realities of global politics and power. I had begun my studies full of enthusiasm; I had this huge feeling inside me that with just a little bit of effort, I could solve the world’s problems. I soon became immersed in a world of economic theory, profit motives, multinational corporations and conflicts over resources. Hundreds of years of history put the state of the modern world into context. I came to realise that I wasn’t the first person to have the bright idea to try and sort out this mess.

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